The anticipation of spring

As the days grow longer and the temperature begins to rise, likewise does our anticipation for spring.

It’s that time of year when we dust off our binoculars and clean our camera lenses in preparation for the increased activity that ensues throughout the warmer months. The birds and the bees start to do their thing as much of the regions flowers begin to bloom and many fauna species kick into action as they shake off the sleepy dormancy of winter.

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Slaty helmet orchid


That said, winter can still surprise and a couple of us here at the Corangamite CMA made the most of those brief warm days in August to get outside into some of the local bush land near Geelong and look for some of our local orchid species.

We were pleasantly surprised with the number and variety of orchids that could be found at this time of year.

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Tall greenhood


The greenhoods were most visible and it didn’t take us long to come across the tall, nodding and dwarf greenhoods.

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Dwarf greehood (left); Nodding greenhood (centre); and veined helmet orchid (right)
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gnat orchid


Looking a little harder we started seeing many of the telltale signs of some of the smaller orchid species – their leaves.
It wasn’t long after a little more searching¬† before we found these orchids flowering, often en masse.

Species included both the veined and slaty helmet orchids, as well as the small gnat orchid.

To cap the day off, one of the group was lucky enough to capture the elusive and stunning spotted pardalote on their way home.
 
If this is what winter can bring, the anticipation for spring grows.

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Spotted pardalote